Quote for Today: L.M. Montogomery

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“Oh, here we are at the bridge. I’m going to shut my eyes tight. I’m always afraid going over bridges. I can’t help imagining that perhaps, just as we get to the middle, they’ll crumple up like a jackknife and nip us. So I shut my eyes. But I always have to open them for all when I think we’re getting near the middle. Because, you see, if the bridge did crumple up I’d want to see it crumple. What a jolly rumble it makes! I always like the rumble part of it. Isn’t it splendid there are so many things to like in this world?”
―Anne Shirley, in L.M. Montgomery‘s  Anne of Green Gables
Public Domain Image via Pexels.com

Quote for Today: Sinclair Lewis

Good Lord, I don’t know what ‘rights’ a man has! And I don’t know the solution of boredom. If I did, I’d be the one philosopher that had the cure for living. But I do know that about ten times as many people find their lives dull, and unnecessarily dull, as ever admit it; and I do believe that if we busted out and admitted it sometimes, instead of being nice and patient and loyal for sixty years, and then nice and patient and dead for the rest of eternity, why, maybe, possibly, we might make life more fun.
Sinclair LewisBabbitt
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Public Domain Image via Pixabay

Separated from our Roots: Offshore by Kelly Ledsinger

There are emotions that are universal, or nearly so. The paradox is that they feel personal and difficult to share.

Oil Platform at Night © Mark Mitchell with CCLicense

Oil Platform at Night
© Mark Mitchell with CCLicense

Kelly Ledsinger shared this poem, entitled Offshore, at our last Open Mic, The Journey. What is most striking about it for me is the honesty and extreme openness of the expression. Some poets rant and rave and amplify their emotions, while others try to forge distance between themselves and their feelings. There is nothing wrong with either approach, but Ledsinger takes another path, uniquely and refreshingly present with her emotions, full of a poetic mindfulness that allows emotion to breathe. It is a brave poet that lays the details of her life before the audience. She paves the way for empathy by sharing first.

OFFSHORE

He rises early and packs his duffle with a weeks worth of underwear and denim. He never really sleeps much before his journey. He makes a thermos of coffee for the drive to the Gulf. It will help him stay awake on those long dark stretches of Texas road

She packs him snacks for his drive, fusses and worries that he hasn’t had enough sleep. She always worries about him falling asleep behind the wheel. She can picture the officer at her door and the widow’s sob on her lips. But they have a son still in college, a mortgage and retirement to fund. So he climbs in the old beat up truck he drives. He won’t leave a nice truck sitting for the Gulf winds, the sea and the sand to corrode. No use in throwing good money after bad he says. He packs his bible, his daily devotional, a small worn copy of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, Time magazine and a radio.

He likes to listen to NPR and classical music. He knows most of the people he works with will be listening to Fox News and country music. He knows he is different. It doesn’t matter much. He is of an age where what others think matters less. He is his own man as much as he can be without losing his job. He hates working on an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico. But he loves his wife of thirty-three years and their son. He is so proud of his son. He and his wife are having a rough patch right now. But they will weather it like they have everything else life has dealt them. The marriage is their lifeboat in a world of storms and they cling to it with the desperation of the drowning.

He arrives at the Heliport. Gets his duffle and secures his car. He looks around the waiting area as the other men arrive. He sees the young guy who is a vegetarian and who shares his bunk room with him. He’s alright he thinks and doesn’t mind his choice in politics or music. He wonders if the chef is going to make some of that caramelized condensed milk again. That was really good. Twelve hour plus days in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico on a rusty, corroding oil platform. Not much to think about for a week except keeping everything running, staying alive, fresh warm caramel and your wife’s voice on the phone when you call her at bedtime. They announce their helicopter is boarding he lifts his duffle, climbs up the steps of the helicopter. Finds a seat, straps himself in and says a prayer for leaving land.

~

Human beings have experienced separation at the mercy of the sea for millennia. Life requires that parents divide their time between making a living for their children and being present with those children, that explorers and innovators leave behind their homes and those who love them for a time in order to do what they must do. Life is a constant alternation between traveling and putting down roots. It is in planting roots and becoming separate from them that we find out who we are and what is important to us.

Offshore reminds me very much of a famous French song by Faure, called Les Berceaux, or The Cradles. You can watch a video of that song below, complete with translation. It’s amazing to think how little some things change, even as technology creates new experiences.

The Message is the Journey: Trail Therapy with Steve Fugate

A snaggle-toothed and grizzled man walks along the road, supplies for his journey rolling behind him. How do you react?

To be honest, people who share the road with Steve Fugate feel a great number of uncomfortable emotions, including compassion, fear, pity, and even disgust. There are those who think someone should help get this man off the road and those who think he should settle down and get a job. There are others who try to understand the meaning of his journey and the sign that hangs over his head, proclaiming “Love life”. It’s worth trying to understand.

My creed is to mend the broken heart while it is yet beating. –Steve Fugate

In 1999, while hiking the Appalachian Trail, Steve received word that his beloved son had shot himself. After leaving the trail to bury his son, he returned to finish the trip, crying every step of the way and finding some degree of healing and freedom in mourning his son in such a fashion. He resolved that he would devote himself to letting others know that their lives have value. Not knowing “how to scream on paper”, he decided to walk around the United States encouraging others. In doing so, he has placed himself in a position vulnerable to both the cruelty and kindness of strangers and has forgone the security of a steady job and a permanent home.

He was aided in his first two walks by his daughter, who planned and orchestrated his travels. Tragedy deepened when she, who suffered from Multiple Sclerosis, died of an accidental drug overdose in 2005. He hasn’t stopped walking since her death. His Facebook page reveals that, at the time of this writing, he is in Oneonta, NY.

This video by Cyrus Sutton is beautiful and honest. There is rough language, but I think we can understand the desire to do away with taboo and subterfuge. Steve affirms that life is difficult, beautiful and worth living, as he experiences pain and joy on the road. He finds himself shored up by the kindness of others daily. What a testament to life and the human spirit!

Video via KORDUROY.tv on Vimeo.

Safe travels!

Quote for Today: Henri Nouwen

Touch the Air © Lilynoelle with CCLicense

Touch the Air
© Lilynoelle with CCLicense

To care means first of all to empty our own cup and to allow the other to come close to us. It means to take away the many barriers which prevent us from entering into communion with the other. When we dare to care, then we discover that nothing human is foreign to us, but that all the hatred and love, cruelty and compassion, fear and joy can be found in our own hearts. When we dare to care, we have to confess that when others kill, I could have killed too. When others torture, I could have done the same. When others heal, I could have healed too. And when others give life, I could have done the same. Then we experience that we can be present to the soldier who kills, to the guard who pesters, to the young man who plays as if life has no end, and to the old man who stopped playing out of fear for death.

Henri NouwenOut of Solitude

We’ve quoted Henri Nouwen before here.

Quote for Today: Shauna Niequist

Fish Magic, Paul Klee, 1925

Fish Magic, Paul Klee, 1925

I know that life is busy and hard and that there’s crushing pressure to just settle down and get a real job and khaki pants and a haircut. But don’t. Please don’t. Please keep believing that life can be better, brighter, broader because of the art that you make. Please keep demonstrating the courage that it takes to swim upstream in a world that prefers putting away for retirement to putting pen to paper, that chooses practicality over poetry, that values you more for going to the gym than going to the deepest places in your soul. Please keep making your art for people like me, people who need the magic and imagination and honesty of great art to make the day-to-day world a little more bearable.

Shauna Niequist

Best wishes for a 2014 full of new things, including more synchronicity!