Quote for Today: Daniel Pink

Most important, in flow, the relationship between what a person had to do and what he could do was perfect. The challenge wasn’t too easy. Nor was it too difficult. It was a notch or two beyond his current abilities, which stretched the body and mind in a way that made the effort itself the most delicious reward. That balance produced a degree of focus and satisfaction that easily surpassed other, more quotidian, experiences. In flow, people lived so deeply in the moment, and felt so utterly in control, that their sense of time, place, and even self melted away. They were autonomous, of course. But more than that, they were engaged.

Daniel Pink, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Image by Katerina Knizakova from Pixabay

Quote for Today: Richelle Goodrich

800px-Survival_for_the_next_generation

 

It is easy to say I am thankful for the sweet and beautiful things in life: flower gardens, ice cream cones, diamond rings, dances under moonlight, children’s laughter, birdsongs, and the like. The challenge is recognizing things of value in the dark, sour, uglier parts of life. But if you look hard enough, you will find that even tough times offer pearls worthy of gratitude.

Richelle Goodrich, Slaying Dragons

Image: Survival for the Next Generation, Bangladesh by Bd person with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Eleanor Roosevelt

child-636022_640

The encouraging thing is that every time you meet a situation, though you may think at the time it is an impossibility and you go through the tortures of the damned, once you have met it and lived through it you find that forever after you are freer than you ever were before. If you can live through that, you can live through anything. You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.
Eleanor Roosevelt

Public Domain Image via Pixabay

Quote for Today: Wade Davis

maori-1421105_960_720.jpg

The world in which you were born is just one model of reality. Other cultures are not failed attempts at being you; they are unique manifestations of the human spirit.

If diversity is a source of wonder, its opposite – the ubiquitous condensation to some blandly amorphous and singularly generic modern culture that takes for granted an impoverished environment – is a source of dismay. There is, indeed, a fire burning over the earth, taking with it plants and animals, cultures, languages, ancient skills and visionary wisdom. Quelling this flame, and re-inventing the poetry of diversity is perhaps the most important challenge of our times.

–-Wade Davis, The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World

Public Domain Image via Pixabay

 

Quote for Today: Stephen Batchelor

woman-674977_960_720.jpg

By identifying with a craving (‘I want this,” “don’t want’ that”), you tighten the clutch and intensify its resistance. Instead of being a state of mind that you have, it becomes a compulsion that has you. As with understanding anguish, the challenge in letting go of craving is to act before habitual reactions incapacitate us.

Stephen Batchelor, Buddhism without Beliefs: A Contemporary Guide to Awakening

 

Public Domain Image via Pixabay

Quote for Today: Richelle Goodrich

1902322480_08037ca1a3_z.jpg

If you couldn’t sense heat, you’d not be alive. And if that heat never grew uncomfortable, you would never move. And if you were stagnant—unchallenged by unpredictable flares—you would never grow capable of shielding yourself from harsher flames. So yes, life was meant to drag you straight through the fire.

Richelle Goodrich, Making Wishes

Image: Lewes Bonfire Night 2007 – Wall of Flame © Dominic Alves with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Erik Pevernagie

800px-Snake_skin_for_healing_practise.jpg
Like a snake sheds its skin, we are capable of getting rid of assembled habits, creating space to call matters into question. Instead of the Shakespearean “To be or not to be ” we could favor “to become or not to become”. By “becoming”, we challenge the range of possibilities in our life and go beyond the merely “being”. We can retreat, then, from the imprisonment of a deadly routine, acquire an identity and develop our personality.
Erik Pevernagie, “Man without Qualities”
Image © Malcolm Lidbury with CCLicense