Scanning the Nest: The Art of Ellen Hoverkamp

Technology constantly creates tools, but we seldom explore their full artistic potential. Pioneer Ellen Hoverkamp makes art with a scanner. Ellen Hoverkamp began making photographic images with her flatbed scanner in 1997, enjoying the dramatic three dimensional look which she has further developed with such elegance. Her images have a very classic feel, often recalling Victorian botanical illustrations. She's also … Continue reading Scanning the Nest: The Art of Ellen Hoverkamp

Animal Images: Inspiration from Nature, Part One

From adorable kittens and puppies to majestic lions and wolves, we love pictures of animals. What need do they fulfill? When I am attracted to the image of animal, be it a painting, a sculpture, a photo or any other representation, it is usually because I'm identifying with the creature's attributes or abilities. That kitten is so … Continue reading Animal Images: Inspiration from Nature, Part One

Sharing a Difficult Journey: The Art Installations of Serge Alain Nitegeka

How do we break cycles of violence? Art helps us share painful personal stories and build empathy across cultural lines. Serge Alain Nitegeka was born in 1983 in the African nation of Burundi. When he was eleven years old his homeland erupted into open conflict between the Tutsi and Hutu tribes, violence that devastated Burundi and neighboring Rwanda. … Continue reading Sharing a Difficult Journey: The Art Installations of Serge Alain Nitegeka

What Lies Between: Exploring the Japanese Tea Garden

Transitioning from busy exterior lives to our private lives is difficult. How do we keep a quiet place for ourselves? The Japanese tea ceremony, cha-no-yu, and tea garden, roji, evolved from traditions and tea from China. The Buddhist monk Eichū  was the first person acknowledged to celebrate the ceremony in Japan during the 9th Century, after returning … Continue reading What Lies Between: Exploring the Japanese Tea Garden

Icons of Irony: The Grinning Faces of Yue Minjun

What remains when our faith in the institutions around us is shattered? Chinese artist Yue Minjun's work gives an answer. Yue Minjun was born in the town of Daqing, China in 1962. His parents were nomadic oil field workers and he seemed destined to follow in their footsteps, but a brush with art during his high school years planted a … Continue reading Icons of Irony: The Grinning Faces of Yue Minjun

I Don’t Know How to Thank You: Synkroniciti’s Second Open Mic Soars

Spirits soared at last week's Open Mic. Would you like to be part of the community we are building? Last Sunday, synkroniciti hosted our second Open Mic, exploring the theme of gratitude. I was so grateful for our first experience in September, and November is a traditional time to express thankfulness, so it seemed an appropriate choice. That … Continue reading I Don’t Know How to Thank You: Synkroniciti’s Second Open Mic Soars

Creatures of the Wind: Theo Jansen’s Strandbeesten

We are born with the urge to build and make things. What does this creativity tell us about our origins? Since 1990, Dutch artist Theo Jansen has been designing animals from PVC pipe and walking them up and down the beach. His search to create new forms of life has many sources of inspiration, from Biblical creation … Continue reading Creatures of the Wind: Theo Jansen’s Strandbeesten

Art and Agriculture: Sam van Aken and the Tree of Forty Fruit

Art often grants insight, but can it provide solutions? Creativity meets agriculture in the work of artist Sam van Aken. Sam van Aken is head of the Sculpture Program at Syracuse University, and perhaps sculpture is the backbone of his creative endeavors, but the body of that work integrates technology, art, imagination and skill in surprising combinations. He's … Continue reading Art and Agriculture: Sam van Aken and the Tree of Forty Fruit