Quote for Today: W.B. Yeats

Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing circa 1786 by William Blake 1757-1827

Come, faeries, take me out of this dull house!
Let me have all the freedom I have lost;
Work when I will and idle when I will!
Faeries, come take me out of this dull world,
For I would ride with you upon the wind,
Run on the top of the dishevelled tide,
And dance upon the mountains like a flame.
W.B. Yeats, “The Land of Heart’s Desire,” 1894

Image: Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing. William Blake, 1786

 

 

Quote for Today: Wendell Berry

plow_mule_labrador_work_break_rustic_traditional-790083

Good work uses no thing without respect, both for what it is in itself and for its origin. It uses neither tool nor material that it does not respect and that it does not love. It honors nature as a great mystery and power, as an indispensable teacher, and as the inescapable judge of all work of human hands. It does not dissociate life and work, or pleasure and work, or love and work, or usefulness and beauty. To work without pleasure or affection, to make a product that is not both useful and beautiful, is to dishonor God, nature, the thing that is made, and whomever it is made for. This is blasphemy: to make shoddy work of the work of God.
Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays

Public Domain Image via PxHere

Quote for Today: Ann Brasco

512px-Kintugi

We readily forget what we once knew as children: our flaws are not only natural but integral to our beings. They are interwoven into our soul’s DNA and yet we continually reject the crooked, wrinkled, mushy parts of our life rather than embrace them as the very essence of our beings.

I once believed that aiming for perfection would land me in the realm of excellence. This, however, may not be the trajectory of how things happen. In fact, the pursuit of perfection may be the biggest obstacle to becoming whole.

It seems essential to value hard work and determination and yet recognize that the road to excellence is littered with mistakes and subsequent lessons. Imperfection and excellence are intertwined. There is joy in our pain, strength in weakness, courage in compassion, and power in forgiveness.
Ann Brasco, “Killing Off Perfectionism”

Image © Haragayato with CCLicense

Quote for Today: L. P. Jacks

thailand_women_field_female_summer_people_outdoor_healthy-852224A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both.

L. P. Jacks, Education through Recreation

Public Domain Image via PxHere.com

Quote for Today: Henry David Thoreau

img_3945_28351721045_o

I am alarmed when it happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit. In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations, and my obligations to society. But it sometimes happens that I cannot easily shake off the village. The thought of some work will run in my head, and I am not where my body is; I am out of my senses. In my walks I would fain return to my senses. What business have I in the woods, if I am thinking of something out of the woods?
Henry David Thoreau, “Walking”

Light and Shade on the Wapiti Trail, Sugarite Canyon SP, Raton, New Mexico by Katherine McDaniel

Quote for Today: Mother Teresa

6963630077_27aae282e6_z

Be kind in your actions. Do not think that you are the only one who can do efficient work, work worth showing. This makes you harsh in your judgment of others who may not have the same talents. Do your best and trust that others do their best. And be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.

―Mother Teresa, In the Heart of the World: Thoughts, Stories and Prayers
Image © LadyDragonflyCC with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Danny Elfman

5122916967_f754cc1b3c_z
It often feels like a tremendous amount of work is required to get an idea moving forward, like pushing a train uphill. But at a certain point, the thing takes on its own momentum, and takes unexpected turns. So it’s that feeling of holding on, rather than pushing it, that is the most exciting thing. It’s that need to occasionally bounce off the walls, letting anything happen for any reason, and having nothing to guide you that is the joy.

Image: Lawrence Rayner with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Doris Lessing

Clothes Line Dream Omo Sun © Janis Miglavs with CCLicense

Clothes Line Dream Omo Sun
© Janis Miglavs with CCLicense

Over the plains of Ethiopia the sun rose as I had not seen it in seven years. A big, cool, empty sky flushed a little above a rim of dark mountains. The landscape 20,000 feet below gathered itself from the dark and showed a pale gleam of grass, a sheen of water. The red deepened and pulsed, radiating streaks of fire. There hung the sun, like a luminous spider’s egg, or a white pearl, just below the rim of the mountains. Suddenly it swelled, turned red, roared over the horizon and drove up the sky like a train engine. I knew how far below in the swelling heat the birds were an orchestra in the trees about the villages of mud huts; how the long grass was straightening while dangling locks of dewdrops dwindled and dried; how the people were moving out into the fields about the business of herding and hoeing.
Doris LessingGoing Home