Quote for Today: Clarissa Pinkola Estés

 

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Stories set the inner life into motion, and this is particularly important where the inner life is frightened, wedged, or cornered. Story greases the hoists and pulleys, it causes adrenaline to surge, shows us the way out, down, or up, and for our trouble, cuts for us fine wide doors in previously blank walls, openings that lead to the dreamland, that lead to love and learning, that lead us back to our own real lives as knowing wildish women.

Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Women Who Run With the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype

Image: Dye House Machinery by Glen Bledsoe with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Vera Nazarian

Space Planet Surreal Person Looking At Stars

We are all glorified motion sensors.

Some things only become visible to us when they undergo change.

We take for granted all the constant, fixed things, and eventually stop paying any attention to them. At the same time we observe and obsess over small, fast-moving, ephemeral things of little value.

The trick to rediscovering constants is to stop and focus on the greater panorama around us. While everything else flits abut, the important things remain in place.

Their stillness appears as reverse motion to our perspective, as relativity resets our motion sensors. It reboots us, allowing us once again to perceive.

And now that we do see, suddenly we realize that those still things are not so motionless after all. They are simply gliding with slow individualistic grace against the backdrop of the immense universe.

And it takes a more sensitive motion instrument to track this.
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Public Domain Image via MaxPixel

Quote for Today: Alain de Botton

 

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We need a home in the psychological sense as much as we need one in the physical: to compensate for a vulnerability. We need a refuge to shore up our states of mind, because so much of the world is opposed to our allegiances. We need our rooms to align us to desirable versions of ourselves and to keep alive the important, evanescent sides of us.
Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

Image: Happy Place © Janko Luin with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Leo Tolstoy

Individual Awareness Light Smoldering Loneliness

If, then, I were asked for the most important advice I could give, that which I considered to be the most useful to the men of our century, I should simply say: in the name of God, stop a moment, cease your work, look around you.
Leo Tolstoy, Essays, Letters and Miscellanies

 

Public Domain Image via MaxPixel

Quote for Today: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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There is something at the bottom of every new human thought, every thought of genius, or even every earnest thought that springs up in any brain, which can never be communicated to others, even if one were to write volumes about it and were explaining one’s idea for thirty-five years; there’s something left which cannot be induced to emerge from your brain, and remains with you forever; and with it you will die, without communicating to anyone perhaps the most important of your ideas.
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot
Image: Pit From the Bottom © Giobabi with CCLicense

Quote for Today: John Marsden

the smiling face of Anatolia © Tuna Akçay with CCLicense

the smiling face of Anatolia
© Tuna Akçay with CCLicense

Light is important to us humans. It influences our moods, our perceptions, our energy levels. A face glimpsed among trees, dappled by the shadows and the green-tinged light reflected from the forest, will seem quite different to the same face seen on a beach in hard, dry, sunlight, or in a darkening room at twilight, with the shadows of a venetian blind striped across it like a convict’s uniform.

John MarsdenEverything I Know About Writing

Quote for Today: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

© maf04 with CCLicense

© maf04 with CCLicense

 

Suppose I happen to know a unique flower, one that exists nowhere in the world except on my planet, one that a little sheep can wipe out in a single bite one morning, just like that, without even realizing what he’d doing – that isn’t important? If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all the millions and millions of stars, that’s enough to make him happy when he looks at the stars. He tells himself “My flower’s up there somewhere…” But if the sheep eats the flower, then for him it’s as if, suddenly, all the stars went out. And that isn’t important?

Antoine de Saint-ExupéryThe Little Prince
Synkroniciti has quoted The Little Prince before here.