Call for Submissions

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We are so excited to announce that we are accepting submissions for our new online magazine, debuting in August 2019. Submission deadline for the Summer Issue is July 15th, 2019.

Synkroniciti Summer 2019

The submission fee is $3. Here are the categories of work we are seeking, along with submission guidelines for each category. You may submit more than one entry in one or more categories.

Don’t want to pay submission fees? Become a subscriber and you will have unlimited free entries (as long as you are currently subscribed).

If your work is selected we request the right to publish it in both the e-book and blog-style versions of the Synkroniciti magazine. You may also volunteer to be part of our promotional release. With your permission, will use your work or part of your work to advertise the magazine to potential subscribers.

Poetry: Send up to 5 poems in pdf format, 10-12…

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Quote for Today: Hope Jahren

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After scientists broke open the coat of a lotus seed (Nelumbo nucifera) and coddled the embryo into growth, they kept the empty husk. When they radiocarbon-dated this discarded outer shell, they discovered that their seedling had been waiting for them within a peat bog in China for no less than two thousand years. This tiny seed had stubbornly kept up the hope of its own future while entire human civilizations rose and fell. And then one day this little plant’s yearning finally burst forth within a laboratory.
Hope Jahren, Lab Girl

Image: Inside a Lotus Flower © Katja Schulz with CCLicense

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Quote for Today: Jerry Spinelli

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Paschimotanasana © Nina Mel with CCLicense Paschimotanasana
© Nina Mel with CCLicense

It’s in the morning, for most of us. It’s that time, those few seconds, when we’re coming out of sleep but we’re not really awake yet. For those few seconds we’re something more primitive than what we are about to become. We have just slept the sleep of our most distant ancestors, and something of them and their world still clings to us. For those few moments we are unformed, uncivilized. We are not the people we know as ourselves, but creatures more in tune with a tree than a keyboard. We are untitled, unnamed, natural, suspended between was and will be, the tadpole before the frog, the worm before the butterfly. We are for a few brief moments, anything and everything we could be. And then… and then– ah– we open our eyes and the day is before us and… we become ourselves.

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Creating from Nightmare: H.R. Giger’s Biomechanics and Alien

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The arts attempt to convey visions and concepts from one mind to another. Is there value in translating nightmare?

© Ars Electronica with CCLicense H.R. Giger Gigapixelpicture © Ars Electronica in accordance with Fair Use Policy

A brain is only capable of what it could conceive, and it couldn’t conceive what it hasn’t experienced.

Graham GreeneBrighton Rock

Biomechanical Landscape image © dreamside with CCLicense H.R. Giger, Biomechanical Landscape
image © dreamside in accordance with Fair Use Policy

Everyone experiences at some point the fearful awakening from nightmare: the unelicited scream, the chest tight with overabundance of breath, the sudden jolt into consciousness. Whether the dream recoils quickly into oblivion or haunts us for hours or days, we know it has power over us, at least when we are asleep. Some artists are given to exploring their nightmares and fleshing out what lies there. The attempt to share fear, whether to amplify or dilute it, to bring others to a…

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Quote for Today: Guillermo del Toro

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In fairy tales, monsters exist to be a manifestation of something that we need to understand, not only a problem we need to overcome, but also they need to represent, much like angels represent the beautiful, pure, eternal side of the human spirit, monsters need to represent a more tangible, more mortal side of being human: aging, decay, darkness and so forth. And I believe that monsters originally, when we were cavemen and you know, sitting around a fire, we needed to explain the birth of the sun and the death of the moon and the phases of the moon and rain and thunder. And we invented creatures that made sense of the world: a serpent that ate the sun, a creature that ate the moon, a man in the moon living there, things like that. And as we became more and more sophisticated and created sort of a social…

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Between Wildness and Domestication: Wolf Mountain Sanctuary

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Humans are fascinated by wildness, but interaction with humans changes a wild animal permanently. Where do such animals find a home?

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Tonya Littlewolf runs Wolf Mountain Sanctuary in Lucerne Valley, located in the southern Mojave Desert in California. She makes a home here for wolves whose lives have been threatened by humans. Most have been raised as pets, only to be discarded when they grew too big, too hard to control and too expensive to feed. A wolf that has lived with humans does not become a tame dog, neither is that animal wild anymore. These wolves, if released from their sanctuary, would approach humans in search of food. Sooner or later, that kind of behavior will get an animal killed, especially a large predator that stirs a mythological fear in human beings.

Born in New Mexico of Chiricahua Mescalero Apache and Sicilian heritage, Tonya was introduced to wild animals…

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Quote for Today: Susan Griffin

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She was a normal wild beast, whose power is dangerous, whose anger can kill, they had said. Be more careful of her, they advised. Allow her less excitement. Perhaps let her exercise more. She understood none of this. She understood only the look of fear in her keeper’s eyes. And now she paces. Paces as if she were angry, as if she were on the edge of frenzy. The spectators imagine she is going through the movements of the hunt, or that she is readying her body for survival. But she knows no life outside the garden. She has no notion of anger over what she could have been, or might be. No idea of rebellion.
It is only her body that knows of these things, moving her, daily, hourly, back and forth, back and forth, before the bars of her cage.
Susan Griffin, Woman and Nature: The…

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