Quote for Today: Jenny Downham

16951528769_7f2f39294a_z.jpg

“It comes and goes. People think if you’re sick you become fearless and brave, but you don’t. Most of the time it’s like being stalked by a psycho, like I might get shot any second. But sometimes I forget for hours.”
“What makes you forget?”
“People. Doing stuff. When I was with you in the wood, I forgot for a whole afternoon.”

Jenny Downham, Before I Die

Image: Holding On (Father and son), Public Domain Image via U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Quote for Today: Eleanor Roosevelt

child-636022_640

The encouraging thing is that every time you meet a situation, though you may think at the time it is an impossibility and you go through the tortures of the damned, once you have met it and lived through it you find that forever after you are freer than you ever were before. If you can live through that, you can live through anything. You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.
Eleanor Roosevelt

Public Domain Image via Pixabay

Quote for Today: Neel Mukherjee

watercolor-1487206_960_720

Mollycoddling was the mother’s duty; the father’s lay elsewhere. As a consequence, his four older children feared and respected him, as they had been taught to do, and the love they professed to feel, had they been asked and had they answered truthfully or even had access to the truth, was of a duty-bound, obligatory kind too, a love issuing from commandment and tradition and the notion of family, not one from the tides of the heart or the unbridled, inexplicable pull of feelings. If painted, that love would take the form of a polite and manicured wash of pleasant colours, not the hurl-and-splatter of impastoed reds.
Neel Mukherjee, The Lives of Others

Public Domain image via Pixabay

Quote for Today: Leo Tolstoy

Levin had often noticed in discussion between the most intelligent people that after enormous efforts, and endless logical subtleties and talk, the disputants finally became aware that what they had been at such pains to prove to one another had long ago, from the beginning of the argument, been known to both, but that they liked different things, and would not define what they liked for fear of its being attacked. He had often had the experience of suddenly in the middle of a discussion grasping what it was the other liked and at once liking it too, and immediately he found himself agreeing, and then all arguments fell away useless. Sometimes the reverse happened: he at last expressed what he liked himself, which he had been arguing to defend and, chancing to express it well and genuinely, had found the person he was disputing with suddenly agree.

Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

Public Domain Image via MaxPixel

Quote for Today: Cate Blanchett

4466548524_b13cdbb7d3_z.jpg

It’s not just women in film, 18-year-old girls feel pressure to do preventative injecting. I see someone’s face, someone’s body who’d had children and I think they’re the song lines of your experience, and why would you want to eradicate that? I look at people sort of entombing themselves and all you see is little pin holes of terror… and you think, just live your life, death is not going to be any easier just because your face can’t move.

Cate Blanchett, “Motherhood, Hollywood and Cate”, The Age, May 9 2005

Image: Pure Terror © Shelby H. with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Charlotte Eriksson

light-1283000_640.jpg

I was never afraid of the dark and I spent my youth walking through empty playgrounds at midnight, worried mothers telling girls to be careful and ”the world is an ugly place and not everyone wants you well”. But I was not afraid and I wished for adrenaline to make my veins pulsate in that way that puts them more on the outside of my skin than inside.
After the first night with you I never walked alone at night again because suddenly I had something to lose. Something to save.
Charlotte Eriksson

Public Domain Image via Pixabay

Quote for Today: James McBride

Vivian_Malone_registering

It was always so hot, and everyone was so polite, and everything was all surface but underneath it was like a bomb waiting to go off. I always felt that way about the South, that beneath the smiles and southern hospitality and politeness were a lot of guns and liquor and secrets.
James McBride, The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother

Public Domain Image: Vivian Malone, one of the first African Americans to attend the University of Alabama