Quote for Today: William Wordsworth

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What though the radiance which was once so bright
Be now for ever taken from my sight,
Though nothing can bring back the hour
Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower;
We will grieve not, rather find
Strength in what remains behind;
In the primal sympathy
Which having been must ever be;
In the soothing thoughts that spring
Out of human suffering;
In the faith that looks through death,
In years that bring the philosophic mind.
William Wordsworth, from “Ode: Intimations of Immortality”, Recollections of Early Childhood
Image: Poppy, Snug Harbor Botanical Gardens, Staten Island, 2014, by Katherine McDaniel

Quote for Today: Franklin Lushington

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There is no quicker way of growing old than undue indulgence in regular habits. Indeed it seems probable that the reason why so many people die sooner than they should is because they have organised their lives in such a way that there is nothing left for them to do. Change, as is well-known, is not only a law of Nature, but the very breath of existence. And if you rule change out of your life there no longer seems any reason why you should continue altogether.

―Franklin Lushington, Cottage in Kyrenia
Public Domain Image via publicdomainpictures.net

Quote for Today: Jetta Carleton

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Suddenly it seemed to me that I looked back from a great distance on that smile and saw it all again – the smile and the day, the whole sunny, sad, funny, wonderful day and all the days that we had spent here together. What was I going to do when such days came no more? There could not be many; for we were a family growing old. And how would I learn to live without these people? I who needed them so little that I could stay away all year – what should I do without them?
Jetta Carleton, The Moonflower Vine

Image © GlynLowe.com with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Haruki Murakami

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For me- and for everybody else, probably- this is my first experience growing old, and the emotions I’m having, too, are all first-time feelings. If it were something I’d experienced before, then I’d be able to understand it more clearly, but this is the first time, so I can’t. For now all I can do is put off making any detailed judgments and accept things as they are. Just like I accept the sky, the clouds, and the river. And there’s also something kind of comical about it all, something you don’t want to discard completely.
Haruki MurakamiWhat I Talk About When I Talk About Running
Image: Crazy Frickin’ Lady © Orin Zebest with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Jonathan Franzen

And so–for the first time, it seemed–Pip had looked at her mother’s hands. The skin on the back of them wasn’t pink and opaque like her own skin. It was as if the bones and veins were working their way to the surface; as if the skin were water receding to expose shapes at the bottom of a harbor. Although her hair was thick and very long, there were dry-looking strands of gray in it, and the skin at the base of her throat was like a peach a day past ripe. That night, Pip lay awake in bed and worried that her mother might die soon. It was her first premonition of the granite block.
Jonathan Franzen, Purity

Quote for Today: Donald Hall

Old Woman in Sunbonnet, Doris Ulmann

Old Woman in Sunbonnet, Doris Ulmann

Over the years I travelled to another universe. However alert we are, however much we think we know what will happen, antiquity remains an unknown, unanticipated galaxy. It is alien, and old people are a separate form of life. They have green skin, with two heads that sprout antennae. They can be pleasant, they can be annoying–in the supermarket, these old ladies won’t get out of my way–but most important they are permanently other. When we turn eighty, we understand that we are extraterrestrial. If we forget for a moment that we are old, we are reminded when we try to stand up, or when we encounter someone young, who appears to observe green skin, extra heads, and protuberances.

Quote for Today: Christopher Isherwood

detail, Artist in the Bathroom Mirror, Pierre Bonnard Image © Stephen L. Harlow with CCLicense

detail, Artist in the Bathroom Mirror, Pierre Bonnard
Image © Stephen L. Harlow with CCLicense

Staring and staring into the mirror, it sees many faces within its face – the face of the child, the boy, the young man, the not-so-young man – all present still, preserved like fossils on superimposed layers, and, like fossils, dead. Their message to this live dying creature is: Look at us – we have died – what is there to be afraid of?

It answers them: But that happened so gradually, so easily. I’m afraid of being rushed.”
Christopher IsherwoodA Single Man