Quote for Today: Patricia McKillip

Black-Lion-Flame-Wild-Light-Danger-Candle-Energy-2103456[1].jpg

He was sitting in moonlight and candlelight, scratching the head of some beast that looked to Vevay a cross between a lion and a bear. It had black pelt, a flat, broad, fanged face, a powerful bulky body. It seemed to be purring. It cast a smoldering red glance at Vevay then closed it eyes again, leaning heavy against Felan’s knee.
“What on earth is that?” Vevay asked.
“I’ve no idea,” Felan said. “It came out of an old book I was reading once and it never went back in again. It seems harmless and is very obliging: it let the students practice transformation spells on it. It eats strawberries when it can get them.”

Patricia McKillip, Alphabet of Thorn

Public Domain Image via MaxPixel

 

 

 

Quote for Today: Gail Godwin

 

3133747764_4ec96a231c_z

There are two kinds of people. One kind, you can just tell by looking at them at what point they congealed into their final selves. It might be a very nice self, but you know you can expect no more surprises from it. Whereas, the other kind keep moving, changing… They are fluid. They keep moving forward and making new trysts with life, and the motion of it keeps them young. In my opinion, they are the only people who are still alive. You must be constantly on your guard against congealing.

Gail Godwin

Image: This Woman is 105 years old © Joe Green with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Chuck Palahniuk

 

Sky Stars Night Alcatraz Lighthouse Ruins

It’s creepy, but here we are, the Pilgrims, the crackpots of our time, trying to establish our own alternate reality. To build a world out of rocks and chaos.
What it’s going to be, I don’t know.
Even after all that rushing around, where we’ve ended up is the middle of nowhere in the middle of the night.
And maybe knowing isn’t the point.
Where we’re standing right now, in the ruins in the dark, what we build could be anything.

Chuck Palahniuk, Choke

Public Domain Image of Alcatraz Lighthouse via MaxPixel

 

Quote for Today: Aesop’s Fables

 

OspreyNASA

An Eagle was soaring through the air when suddenly it heard the whizz of an Arrow, and felt itself wounded to death. Slowly it fluttered down to the earth, with its life-blood pouring out of it. Looking down upon the Arrow with which it had been pierced, it found that the shaft of the Arrow had been feathered with one of its own plumes. “Alas!” it cried, as it died, “We often give our enemies the means for our own destruction.”

from Aesop’s Fables

Public Domain Image via NASA

From My Garden: Twenty Camellias in Haiku

Last spring I planted camellias in our front flowerbeds, not fully appreciating what a blessing I was giving myself. My husband and I worked the soil, adding amendments to create the acidity needed for the new camellias and azaleas. We went to Maas Nursery, the best place in the Houston area to get camellias, and purchased one Royal Velvet (deep red), one Purple Dawn (purplish pink) and a variety I had never heard of before, Sadaharu Oh (pink and white) named after a baseball player. The Royal Velvet has opened three glorious blooms so far, the Purple Dawn is a week from blooming  for the first time, but the Sadaharu Oh has proved unexpectedly prolific. Eighteen blooms have come and gone over the past month and it shows no sign of slowing down. Every time I tried to count the buds I would lose track somewhere between sixty and seventy.

I have been battling a respiratory infection this winter and without the joy my camellias have brought I don’t know how I would have made it through. But there is something about the fleeting nature of the camellia flower that makes one think of mortality and the beauty of life anyway.

These photos were taken in my garden and in my home and inspired the camellia theme for the week. In turn, I was inspired by the haikus of Matsuo Bashō and decided to try my hand at haikus. Staying traditional by keeping the 5-7-5 syllable count in three lines, I also tried to keep a sense of the jarring, unexpected nature of the content. I don’t know how successful I was, but the enjoyment I received from the mental exercise was well worth the time spent. I hope you will love them.

 

IMG_6325 (2)

a bowl of petals

this fierce corolla looks up

to contain the sun

 

IMG_6823

a pink and white bloom

adorns the glossy green leaves

crowned by threads of light

 

IMG_6601

a bee drinks deeply

ensconced in choice filaments

briefly imprisoned

 

IMG_6604

 the bee roaming freely

high on nectar among petals

is distinctly small

 

IMG_6599

the waxy flower

incapable of flying

makes the bee her slave

 

IMG_6531

in the flower’s bell

a bee hangs like a clapper

that will never ring

 

IMG_6833

after winter rain

shining with damp radiance

blooms have not fallen

 

IMG_6810

a fragile wax bloom

pours out its captured water

cup overflowing

 

IMG_6799

flower petals moist

textured like a infant’s skin

lasting only days

 

IMG_6774

in winter’s darkness

the camellia flowers

bring back the sunlight

 

IMG_6840

blossom beneath leaves

out of reach of wind and rain

afraid of falling

 

IMG_5814

a fallen flower

vibrant colors bathed in tears

is already dead

 

IMG_5813

cradled on pine straw

the flower’s lifeless body

collects dewy tears

 

IMG_6184

like a fallen star

gracing my simple table

bringing nature home

 

IMG_6973

remaining lovely

in a dish splashed with water

bloom cut off from life

 

IMG_6975

 

like a frilly dress

layers exposed for all eyes

she remains empty

 

IMG_6977

moisture is fickle

too much and the bloom will rot

too little she wilts

 

IMG_6976

each bloom so unique

drops in her time from the plant

nature is wasteful

 

IMG_6986

a fleeting flower

dropping helplessly to earth

evokes our own death

 

IMG_6988

a flower lingers

uncoupled from life and dead

may we do the same

 

Quote for Today: Jeanette Winterson

wormhole-2514312_960_720.jpg

You don’t fall in love like you fall in a hole. You fall like falling through space. It’s like you jump off your own private planet to visit someone else’s planet. And when you get there it all looks different: the flowers, the animals, the colours people wear. It is a big surprise falling in love because you thought you had everything just right on your own planet, and that was true, in a way, but then somebody signalled to you across space and the only way you could visit was to take a giant jump. Away you go, falling into someone else’s orbit and after a while you might decide to pull your two planets together and call it home. And you can bring your dog. Or your cat. Your goldfish, hamster, collection of stones, all your odd socks. (The ones you lost, including the holes, are on the new planet you found.)

And you can bring your friends to visit. And read your favourite stories to each other. And the falling was really the big jump that you had to make to be with someone you don’t want to be without. That’s it.

PS You have to be brave.

Jeanette Winterson in Big Questions from Little People: And Simple Answers from Great Minds edited by Gemma Elwin Harris

Public Domain Image via Pixabay

Quote for Today: A. A. Milne

pexels-photo-1174093.jpeg

How did you fall in, Eeyore?” asked Rabbit, as he dried him with Piglet’s handkerchief.
“I didn’t,” said Eeyore.
“But how–”
“I was BOUNCED,” said Eeyore.
“Oo,” said Roo excitedly, “did somebody push you?”
“Somebody BOUNCED me. I was just thinking by the side of the river–thinking, if any of you know what that means–when I received a loud BOUNCE.”
“Oh, Eeyore!” said everybody.
“Are you sure you didn’t slip?” asked Rabbit wisely.
“Of course I slipped. If you’re standing on the slippery bank of a river, and somebody BOUNCES you loudly from behind, you slip. What did you think I did?”

A.A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner

 

Public Domain Image via Pexels.com

Quote for Today: Suzy Kassem

figs_red_coward_fruit_fruits_sweet_fig_fruit-535825

I have been finding treasures in places I did not want to search. I have been hearing wisdom from tongues I did not want to listen. I have been finding beauty where I did not want to look. And I have learned so much from journeys I did not want to take. Forgive me, O Gracious One; for I have been closing my ears and eyes for too long. I have learned that miracles are called miracles because they are often witnessed by only those who can can see through all of life’s illusions. I am ready to see what really exists on other side, what exists behind the blinds, and taste all the ugly fruit instead of all that looks right, plump and ripe.
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Public Domain Image via PxHere

Quote for Today: Louise Glück

spring-1166564_640

Snowdrops

Do you know what I was, how I lived? You know
what despair is; then
winter should have meaning for you.

I did not expect to survive,
earth suppressing me. I didn’t expect
to waken again, to feel
in damp earth my body
able to respond again, remembering
after so long how to open again
in the cold light
of earliest spring—

afraid, yes, but among you again
crying yes risk joy

in the raw wind of the new world.
Louise Glück, Poems 1962-2012

 

Public Domain Image via Pixabay