Quote for Today: Haruki Murakami

All you have to do is wait. Sit tight and wait for the right moment. Not try to change anything by force, just watch the drift of things. Make an effort to cast a fair eye on everything. If you do that, you just naturally know what to do. But everyone’s always too busy. They’re too talented, their schedules are too full. They’re too interested in themselves to think about what’s fair.

Haruki Murakami, Dance Dance Dance

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Quote for Today: Zhuangzi

balance-3356546_1280

Life, death, preservation, loss, failure, success, poverty, riches, worthiness, unworthiness, slander, fame, hunger, thirst, cold, heat – these are the alternations of the world, the workings of fate. Day and night they change place before us, and wisdom cannot spy out their source. Therefore, they should not be enough to destroy your harmony; they should not be allowed to enter the storehouse of the spirit. If you can harmonize and delight in them, master them and never be at a loss for joy; if you can do this day and night without break and make it be spring with everything, mingling with all and creating the moment within your own mind – this is what I call being whole in power.

― Zhuangzi, The Complete Works of Zhuangzi

Image by Quang Nguyen vinh from Pixabay 

From My Garden: Twenty Camellias in Haiku

Last spring I planted camellias in our front flowerbeds, not fully appreciating what a blessing I was giving myself. My husband and I worked the soil, adding amendments to create the acidity needed for the new camellias and azaleas. We went to Maas Nursery, the best place in the Houston area to get camellias, and purchased one Royal Velvet (deep red), one Purple Dawn (purplish pink) and a variety I had never heard of before, Sadaharu Oh (pink and white) named after a baseball player. The Royal Velvet has opened three glorious blooms so far, the Purple Dawn is a week from blooming  for the first time, but the Sadaharu Oh has proved unexpectedly prolific. Eighteen blooms have come and gone over the past month and it shows no sign of slowing down. Every time I tried to count the buds I would lose track somewhere between sixty and seventy.

I have been battling a respiratory infection this winter and without the joy my camellias have brought I don’t know how I would have made it through. But there is something about the fleeting nature of the camellia flower that makes one think of mortality and the beauty of life anyway.

These photos were taken in my garden and in my home and inspired the camellia theme for the week. In turn, I was inspired by the haikus of Matsuo Bashō and decided to try my hand at haikus. Staying traditional by keeping the 5-7-5 syllable count in three lines, I also tried to keep a sense of the jarring, unexpected nature of the content. I don’t know how successful I was, but the enjoyment I received from the mental exercise was well worth the time spent. I hope you will love them.

 

IMG_6325 (2)

a bowl of petals

this fierce corolla looks up

to contain the sun

 

IMG_6823

a pink and white bloom

adorns the glossy green leaves

crowned by threads of light

 

IMG_6601

a bee drinks deeply

ensconced in choice filaments

briefly imprisoned

 

IMG_6604

 the bee roaming freely

high on nectar among petals

is distinctly small

 

IMG_6599

the waxy flower

incapable of flying

makes the bee her slave

 

IMG_6531

in the flower’s bell

a bee hangs like a clapper

that will never ring

 

IMG_6833

after winter rain

shining with damp radiance

blooms have not fallen

 

IMG_6810

a fragile wax bloom

pours out its captured water

cup overflowing

 

IMG_6799

flower petals moist

textured like a infant’s skin

lasting only days

 

IMG_6774

in winter’s darkness

the camellia flowers

bring back the sunlight

 

IMG_6840

blossom beneath leaves

out of reach of wind and rain

afraid of falling

 

IMG_5814

a fallen flower

vibrant colors bathed in tears

is already dead

 

IMG_5813

cradled on pine straw

the flower’s lifeless body

collects dewy tears

 

IMG_6184

like a fallen star

gracing my simple table

bringing nature home

 

IMG_6973

remaining lovely

in a dish splashed with water

bloom cut off from life

 

IMG_6975

 

like a frilly dress

layers exposed for all eyes

she remains empty

 

IMG_6977

moisture is fickle

too much and the bloom will rot

too little she wilts

 

IMG_6976

each bloom so unique

drops in her time from the plant

nature is wasteful

 

IMG_6986

a fleeting flower

dropping helplessly to earth

evokes our own death

 

IMG_6988

a flower lingers

uncoupled from life and dead

may we do the same

 

Quote for Today: Muriel Barbery

 

Nature Camellia Spring Flowers Camellia Flower

In a split second of eternity, everything is changed, transfigured. A few bars of music, rising from an unfamiliar place, a touch of perfection in the flow of human dealings – I lean my head slowly to one side, reflect on the camellia on the moss on the temple, reflect on a cup of tea, while outside the wind is rustling foliage, the forward rush of life is crystalized in a brilliant jewel of a moment that knows neither projects nor future, human destiny is rescued from the pale succession of days, glows with light at last and, surpassing time, warms my tranquil heart.

Muriel Barbery, The Elegance of the Hedgehog
Public Domain Image via MaxPixel.com

Quote for Today: Henry David Thoreau

grass_dew_fresh_garden_green_nature_water_morning-593691

A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener. So our prospects brighten on the influx of better thoughts. We should be blessed if we lived in the present always, and took advantage of every accident that befell us, like the grass which confesses the influence of the slightest dew that falls on it; and did not spend our time in atoning for the neglect of past opportunities, which we call doing our duty. We loiter in winter while it is already spring.

Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Public Domain Image via PxHere

Quote for Today: Annie Dillard

bach-1322706_960_720

The color-patches of vision part, shift, and reform as I move through space in time. The present is the object of vision, and what I see before me at any given second is a full field of color patches scattered just so. The configuration will never be repeated. Living is moving; time is a live creek bearing changing lights. As I move, or as the world moves around me, the fullness of what I see shatters. “Last forever!” Who hasn’t prayed that prayer? You were lucky to get it in the first place. The present is a freely given canvas. That it is constantly being ripped apart and washed downstream goes without saying; it is a canvas, nevertheless.
Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

 

Public Domain Image via Pixabay