Quote for Today: Lilliam Rivera

 

friendship-lifestyle-brand-fun-friends-happy-sunglasses-glasses-selfie-party-eyewear-photomontage-cartoon-vision-care-1034868I thought home needed to be tall and luminous, a glowing building with a luxurious setting. Status. What I failed to understand is home is not where I place my head down at night or the color of my furniture. Home is the people I surrounded myself with, the ones I break bread with. The keepers of my secrets and my fears. It is to be loved and to give love without inhibitions.

Lilliam Rivera, Dealing in Dreams

Public Domain Image via PxHere

Quote for Today: Jenny Downham

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“It comes and goes. People think if you’re sick you become fearless and brave, but you don’t. Most of the time it’s like being stalked by a psycho, like I might get shot any second. But sometimes I forget for hours.”
“What makes you forget?”
“People. Doing stuff. When I was with you in the wood, I forgot for a whole afternoon.”

Jenny Downham, Before I Die

Image: Holding On (Father and son), Public Domain Image via U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Quote for Today: Frederick Douglass

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I have often been utterly astonished, since I came to the north, to find persons who could speak of the singing, among slaves, as evidence of their contentment and happiness. It is impossible to conceive of a greater mistake. Slaves sing most when they are most unhappy. The songs of the slave represent the sorrows of his heart; and he is relieved by them, only as an aching heart is relieved by its tears. At least, such is my experience. I have often sung to drown my sorrow, but seldom to express my happiness. Crying for joy, and singing for joy, were alike uncommon to me while in the jaws of slavery. The singing of a man cast away upon a desolate island might be as appropriately considered as evidence of contentment and happiness, as the singing of a slave; the songs of the one and of the other are prompted by the same emotion.
Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
Image: The Banjo Lesson by Henry Ossawa Tanner, 1893