Top Ten Articles on Synkroniciti 2015

Here are the top articles posted on Synkroniciti during 2015. This year saw fewer articles than videos or photoblogs, but those I posted found resonance with many of you. Click on the article name to read the post. Thank you!!

Gold top 10 winner

© Sam Churchill with CCLicense

 

10. This is Kansas? Thoughts on a Sunrise over Lake Scott

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9. Building Creative Resilience: Strategies for Cultivating Enchantment

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8. Looking Down From the Mountaintop: Remember! Opens a New Season

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7. Literary and Theatrical Magic: Suspension of Disbelief and Resilience

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6. Grab Your Shovel: Guerilla Gardening in Los Angeles

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5. We Were There: Synkroniciti’s Open Mic: Exploring Earth

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4. Unearthly Appetites: Italo Calvino’s The Distance of the Moon

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3. A Tale of Two Conchitas: Reflection on That Obscure Object of Desire

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2. Dawn Without Memory: Isis in Palmyra

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1. The Roots We Carry With Us: Synkroniciti’s Open Mic: The Journey 

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Dawn without Memory: ISIS in Palmyra

Last May, the Islamic State took the ancient city of Palmyra. Why should we care that it is being destroyed?

© Julian Love/Corbis Used in accordance with Fair Use Policy

© Julian Love/Corbis
Used in accordance with Fair Use Policy

ISIS doesn’t have a good track record with UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Nimrud, Nineveh, and now Palmyra have been destroyed under its rule, creating a storm of publicity and engendering hate and fear. Explosives and sledgehammers have met irreplaceable works of art and left them dust, on the grounds that they are idolatrous. Yes, many of these buildings were sacred to ancient gods, gods who are largely forgotten. So why should modern humanity mourn the loss? We believe in completely different gods. Some of us believe in no gods at all.

Tadmor Village within the Temple of Bel, Palmyra, early 20th Century Public Domain Image

Tadmor Village within the Temple of Bel, Palmyra, early 20th Century
Public Domain Image

Suppose that we were to go back in time and systematically destroy any people that worshipped or thought differently than we do. As we go further and further back, we encounter people that are more and more different from us. We find ancestors before they lost or found faith, we find brothers before they took different paths and became the patriarchs of different cultures. To destroy them would mean that we were never born.

To single out groups for obliteration is to deny part of the human story, to remove the memory of nations and their people from the tapestry of history. The human family is all connected. Believer or nonbeliever, we would not be who we are without the influence of many different peoples and faiths. We have always needed one another and continue to do so. Denying this feeds the absolute worst in our already tribal understanding of the world: that we, and people like us, contain the only viable understanding, and anyone else is worth less than we are. This lies behind every type of racism on the globe.

The scariest thing about ISIS is that they take destruction to a new level. This is not a group that will keep the art and riches of the defeated, but one that will destroy every trace of the enemy, even if the “enemy” has been dead for centuries. The destruction of Palmyra is a warning to civilizations living today that practice life differently than ISIS. A warning that they would like to kill you and then remove any trace that you have ever lived from our world. There was a culture in Europe once that had a similar dream. Thank God it is not yet within our grasp as human beings.

© Martin Schmoda Temple of Bel Used in accordance with Fair Use Policy

© Manfred Schmoda
Temple of Bel, now destroyed
Used in accordance with Fair Use Policy

Temple of Baal Shamin, Palmyra © Jerry Strzelecki with CCLicense

Temple of Baal Shamin, Palmyra, now destroyed
© Jerry Strzelecki with CCLicense

© AFP used in accordance with Fair Use Policy

© AFP used in accordance with Fair Use Policy

Want to know more about Palmyra? Check out the UNESCO entry here.