Quote for Today: Robert Mcfarlane

Sunset Path Afternoon Monks Landscape

Paths are the habits of a landscape. They are acts of consensual making. It’s hard to create a footpath on your own…Paths connect. This is their first duty and their chief reason for being. They relate places in a literal sense, and by extension they relate people.

Paths are consensual, too, because without common care and common practice they disappear: overgrown by vegetation, ploughed up or built over (though they may persist in the memorious substance of land law). Like sea channels that require regular dredging to stay open, paths NEED walking.

Robert Macfarlane, The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot

Public Domain Image via MaxPixel

 

Quote for Today: Roman Payne

© Adam Rifkin with CCLicense

Super moon rising in South Dakota
© Adam Rifkin with CCLicense

I fancied my luck to be witnessing yet another full moon. True, I’d seen hundreds of full moons in my life, but they were not limitless. When one starts thinking of the full moon as a common sight that will come again to one’s eyes ad-infinitum, the value of life is diminished and life goes by uncherished. ‘This may be my last moon,’ I sighed, feeling a sudden sweep of sorrow; and went back to reading more of The Odyssey.

―Roman Payne, The Wanderess

Quote for Today: Don DeLillo

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Objects were memory inert. Desk, the bed, et cetera. Objects would survive the one who died first and remind the other of how easily halved a life can become. Death, perhaps, was not the point so much as separation. Chairs, tables, dressers, envelopes. Everything was a common experience, binding them despite their indirections, the slanted apparatus of their agreeing. That they did agree was not in doubt.
Don DeLillo, Players
Image © Tim Evanson with CCLicense

Quote for Today: Peter Matthiessen

Stupas near the north face of Kailash, the sacred Crystal Mountain, Tibet © Yasunori Koide with GNU License

Stupas near the north face of Kailash, the sacred Crystal Mountain, Tibet
© Yasunori Koide with GNU License

I grow into these mountains like a moss. I am bewitched. The blinding snow peaks and the clarion air, the sound of earth and heaven in the silence, the requiem birds, the mythic beasts, the flags, great horns, and old carved stones, the silver ice in the black river, the Kang, the Crystal Mountain. Also, I love the common miracles-the murmur of my friends at evening, the clay fires of smudgy juniper, the coarse dull food, the hardship and simplicity, the contentment of doing one thing at a time… gradually my mind has cleared itself, and wind and sun pour through my head, as through a bell. Though we talk little here, I am never lonely; I am returned into myself. In another life-this isn’t what I know, but how I feel- these mountains were my home; there is a rising of forgotten knowledge, like a spring from hidden aquifers under the earth. To glimpse one’s own true nature is a kind of homegoing, to a place East of the Sun, West of the Moon- the homegoing that needs no home, like that waterfall on the super Suli Gad that turns to mist before touching the earth and rises once again to the sky.

Peter MatthiessenThe Snow Leopard